Superplasticity of Aluminum Alloys: Part Two

Investigations into the superplasticity possibilities of aluminums can lead to many potential gains in finding lighter yet capable materials in terms of strength performance.
This article covers the high-temperature deformation behavior of 5083 at different annealing temperatures and yields some interesting conclusions. Continue reading

Superplasticity of Aluminum Alloys: Part One

It is known that superplasticity refers to the ability of a material to demonstrate under tensile tests very high uniform deformation more than several hundreds percents without visible necking. There are two basic requirements in order to achieve superplastic flow in a polycrystalline material. First, the material must have a very small and stable grain size less than 10 μm. Second, superplasticity is achieved only at relatively high temperatures above 0.5Tm (where Tm is the absolute melting temperature) because superplasticity is diffusion-controlled process. Continue reading