Dynamic Strain Aging in Steel: Part One

Dynamic and static strain aging are the two main methods by which a material is further aged either during or after a period of plastic deformation.
Dynamic strain aging is specifically characterized by a rapid aging process which occurs during the actual straining and is associated with subsequent strength property advancements of the material. Continue reading

High Boron Cast Iron: Part Two

Boride emerged as a good alloying option for iron based alloys to help improve toughness and specifically help in applications where wear resistance is important.
There are many studies available but here we discuss the effect of different tempering temperatures on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high boron white cast iron after air quenching. Continue reading

High Boron Cast Iron: Part One

Boride emerged as a good alloying option for iron based alloys to help improve toughness and specifically help in applications where wear resistance is important.
The addition of boron causes martensite transformation to a mixed state with austenite and this provides the platform for improved overall toughness in the material. Continue reading

FASTMET Iron Processing

The FASTMET process was developed in the 90’s by several key industry players to create a more cost effective iron making process to combat rising natural gas prices which fueled more established processing in place since the 60’s.
The FASTMET process is simple and unique and involves rapid heating which in turn accomplishes a rapid reduction reaction. Continue reading

The ROMELT Process

The Romelt process is born and driven by the ever present need to design effective steel and iron making processes which are much cleaner in respect to their environmental impact.
First industrial Romelt plant is currently being constructed in Burma and is expected to have a design annual capacity of 200,000 tpy. Continue reading

Hydrogen in Steels

The control of hydrogen content in steels is an important task of steelmakers because of its generally detrimental effects on processing characteristics and service performance of steel products. Just a few parts per million of hydrogen dissolved in steel can cause hairline cracks (flakes), hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen blistering and loss of tensile ductility, particularly in large steel castings ingots, blooms and slabs.

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